Epidemiological implications of mobility between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities (bibtex)
by J. Arino, S. Portet
Abstract:
An SIR infectious disease propagation model is considered that incorporates mobility of individuals between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities. Because of the difference in population sizes, the urban centre has standard incidence and satellite cities have mass action incidence. It is shown that the general basic reproduction number __MATH0__ acts as a threshold between global asymptotic stability of the disease free equilibrium and disease persistence. The case of Winnipeg (Manitoba, Canada) and some neighbouring satellite communities is then considered numerically to complement the mathematical analysis, highlighting the importance of taking into account not only __MATH0__ but also other measures of disease severity. It is found that the large urban centre governs most of the behaviour of the general system and control of the spread is better achieved by targeting it rather than reducing movement between the units. Also, the capacity of a satellite city to affect the general system depends on its population size and its connectivity to the main urban centre.
Reference:
Epidemiological implications of mobility between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities (J. Arino, S. Portet), In Journal of Mathematical Biology, volume 71, 2015.
Bibtex Entry:
@Article{ArinoPortet2015,
  Title                    = {{Epidemiological implications of mobility between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities}},
  Author                   = {Arino, J. and Portet, S.},
  Journal                  = {Journal of Mathematical Biology},
  Year                     = {2015},
  Number                   = {5},
  Pages                    = {1243--1265},
  Volume                   = {71},

  Abstract                 = {An SIR infectious disease propagation model is considered that incorporates mobility of individuals between a large urban centre and smaller satellite cities. Because of the difference in population sizes, the urban centre has standard incidence and satellite cities have mass action incidence. It is shown that the general basic reproduction number $\R_0$ acts as a threshold between global asymptotic stability of the disease free equilibrium and disease persistence. The case of Winnipeg (Manitoba, Canada) and some neighbouring satellite communities is then considered numerically to complement the mathematical analysis, highlighting the importance of taking into account not only $\R_0$ but also other measures of disease severity. It is found that the large urban centre governs most of the behaviour of the general system and control of the spread is better achieved by targeting it rather than reducing movement between the units. Also, the capacity of a satellite city to affect the general system depends on its population size and its connectivity to the main urban centre.},
  Doi                      = {10.1007/s00285-014-0854-z},
  Owner                    = {jarino},
  Timestamp                = {2014.12.17},
  Url                      = {http://server.math.umanitoba.ca/~jarino/papers/ArinoPortet-2015-JMB71.pdf}
}
Powered by bibtexbrowser